Mixed Race Children

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There has been a long history of discussion of mixed race children and how they adjust to society. There has been implications that being of mixed race causes a crisis in their identity, but new research says that this view is outdated. An article in Time discussed this in February, 2009.

This is an issue that would have only been brought upon a child by either their environment or the society they live in. For example, in America, the historical one drop rule I'm sure has been a source of confusion.

Imagine a child that is of mixed race and being told that she/he can only identify themselves as black. In America a person is looked at and identified with the group they look more like. However, times are changing and more people are identifying themselves as mixed race. Are Mixed Race Kids Better Adjusted In fact, for the second time this year, the U.S. census allowed individuals to identify with more than one race. There were some individuals that chose two races and some that chose to identify as black.

What is important is that an individual has that choice and how they feel culturally will be a factor in their choice. I recognize that my children will at times be perceived as black, and not mixed race children, and they're not old enough to complete the census, but I included both races based on my knowledge of their character.

Research published in the Journal of Social Issues, Jan 2009 examines how mixed race individuals chose to identify themselves and how their choice (according to them) relates to their psychological well being (i.e., self-esteem, positive attitude) and socialization.

There were one hundred eighty-two High School Mixed Race children who were asked to indicate which race they identify with. They were then classified as identifying with a "low-status" group (i.e., black or Latino), a "high-status" group (i.e., Asian or White), or multiple groups, (Black and White, etc.).

Results showed that in comparison to individuals who identified with either a "low" or "high" status group, those who identified with multiple groups reported equal or higher psychological well being and social engagement. The research discusses potential explanations and implications for understanding mixed race identity.

It is of great importance to engage mixed race children in discussions that build self esteem and let them understand that they have a chance to look through the glass from either side. However, they are not to be burdened with the expectation of trying to change people's perception, but allowed to be themselves.

Mixed Race children, like all children are prone to be affected by peer pressure. Peer pressure is something that is found all over the world regardless of race or culture. As a child gets into his pre-teens and teen years, she/he looks for acceptance and tries to do things to fit into a particular group.

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